sciencefella
er-c:

teacakes:

nativeamericannews:

Navajo Kindergartner Sent Home from School, Ordered to Cut His Hair
On Monday, a 5-year-old Native American boy was sent home on his first day of school and ordered to cut his hair short because it allegedly violated district policy, the boy’s mother said.The child, Malachi Wilson, an enrolled citizen of the Navajo Nation, had been looking forward to his first day of kindergarten at F.J. Young Elementary in Seminole, Texas.

THIS IS TERRIFYING AND HORRIBLE

to navajos cutting your hair is losing your knowledge..this is some boarding school shit

er-c:

teacakes:

nativeamericannews:

Navajo Kindergartner Sent Home from School, Ordered to Cut His Hair

On Monday, a 5-year-old Native American boy was sent home on his first day of school and ordered to cut his hair short because it allegedly violated district policy, the boy’s mother said.
The child, Malachi Wilson, an enrolled citizen of the Navajo Nation, had been looking forward to his first day of kindergarten at F.J. Young Elementary in Seminole, Texas.

THIS IS TERRIFYING AND HORRIBLE

to navajos cutting your hair is losing your knowledge..this is some boarding school shit

elementalphantomthief

saturns-queen:

1-4victor-acknowledges-all:

inunchartedwaters:

amplifytheworld:

referencesforartists:

brenanf999:

dontwantyourmoneysir:

anndruyan:

This is a summary of college only using two pictures; expensive as hell.

That’s my Sociology “book”. In fact what it is is a piece of paper with codes written on it to allow me to access an electronic version of a book. I was told by my professor that I could not buy any other paperback version, or use another code, so I was left with no option other than buying a piece of paper for over $200. Best part about all this is my professor wrote the books; there’s something hilariously sadistic about that. So I pretty much doled out $200 for a current edition of an online textbook that is no different than an older, paperback edition of the same book for $5; yeah, I checked. My mistake for listening to my professor.

This is why we download. 

Spreading this shit like nutella because goddamn textbooks are so expensive. 

not necessarily art related but as someone who couldn’t afford their textbooks this semester this is a godsend

REBLOGGING because after a little digging, I found my $200 textbook for free in PDF form.

friendly reminder that this exists since I know we’re all going back to college soon

Will reblog every time I see it.

For everyone about to return to school

candid-amity
timsaturday:

youarenotdesi:

M.I.A. shitting on ignorant opinions

This isn’t a Nazi Swastika what so ever, as a JEW I can recognize this unlike some people.
Gonna quote straight from wikipedia here.

It is a symbol among the ancient Celts, Indians, and Greeks,[2]as well as in later Buddhism,[4]Jainism,[5]Hinduism,[6][4]and Nazism,[3][4]among other cultures and religions.[4][2]
The word swastika derives from the Sanskrit root ssu(“Good”),asti(“to be”),[4][6]andka(making)[6]The older term gammadion cross derives from its appearance, which is identical to four Greek gamma letters affixed to each other.

What I find interesting is that this is actually a very very good representation of what can happen when white people culturally appropriate something.The Swastika, long before the Nazis came about and started brandishing their own bastardization of it, had a strong religious and cultural significance to a LOT of people.
It didn’t represent anything evil, it didn’t represent a dictatorship that perpetuated one of the most well known genocides taught today.
It only started having this horrible association in the 1920’s when the Nazi party appropriated it as for their logo.
White people, white supremacists, taking something with an already well established past and meaning; and placing their own over it.
Because of these people, swastikas that do not have anything to do with the Nazi party are demonized in most people’s eyes because they don’t know any better, because white people wiped out it’s original meaning in white culture.
People seriously need to learn some history.THIS is the sort of damage that cultural appropriation can do in the long run.

timsaturday:

youarenotdesi:

M.I.A. shitting on ignorant opinions

This isn’t a Nazi Swastika what so ever, as a JEW I can recognize this unlike some people.

Gonna quote straight from wikipedia here.

It is a symbol among the ancient Celts, Indians, and Greeks,[2]as well as in later Buddhism,[4]Jainism,[5]Hinduism,[6][4]and Nazism,[3][4]among other cultures and religions.[4][2]

The word swastika derives from the Sanskrit root ssu(“Good”),asti(“to be”),[4][6]andka(making)[6]The older term gammadion cross derives from its appearance, which is identical to four Greek gamma letters affixed to each other.

What I find interesting is that this is actually a very very good representation of what can happen when white people culturally appropriate something.

The Swastika, long before the Nazis came about and started brandishing their own bastardization of it, had a strong religious and cultural significance to a LOT of people.

It didn’t represent anything evil, it didn’t represent a dictatorship that perpetuated one of the most well known genocides taught today.

It only started having this horrible association in the 1920’s when the Nazi party appropriated it as for their logo.

White people, white supremacists, taking something with an already well established past and meaning; and placing their own over it.

Because of these people, swastikas that do not have anything to do with the Nazi party are demonized in most people’s eyes because they don’t know any better, because white people wiped out it’s original meaning in white culture.

People seriously need to learn some history.
THIS is the sort of damage that cultural appropriation can do in the long run.

forever-prospit-dreamers
gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.
And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.
So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3

!!!!!
NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!
This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”
All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)
Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.

And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.

So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3


!!!!!

NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!

This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”

All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)

Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase